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Posts Tagged ‘Dressings & Condiments’

Oh how I have ALWAYS loved blueberry cream cheese. I remember growing up, in Denver, going to local bagel shops. I would order a blueberry bagel with blueberry cream cheese! I try to limit (well, I have completely in fact) bagels (and other white flour – but maybe some healthy bagels are in my future) but have found no reason to eliminate or limit at all the blueberry cream cheese – this is healthy, 100% natural and full of amazing enzymes.

If you have not read my post about cream cheese and whey, start there. This is what you do with the finished cream cheese product:

The amounts below depend solely on your amount of cream cheese. If you are like me, you use what is left over (raw milk, yogurt, etc.) and the amount always changes.

  1. Put cream cheese (freshly made or softened) in food processor. Add fresh blueberrys and mix until it is a beautiful blue color.
  2. Using the attachment that lets you add while mixing, drizzle in a bit of maple syrup. Remember, you won’t need much if your blueberries are really sweet!
We love as a dip for crackers (plain of course) and on english muffins or toast.
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The juice from the salsa adds so much flavor to the salad!

I broke up my earlier post and this post because I wanted it to be easier to look at this for the recipe and not have to scroll down. I LOVE THIS SALAD. I have fresh lettuce in my garden and it is growing faster than I can use it so I have to keep making new salads. This is so easy (if you have the ingredients – you may see now why my previous posts have been building blocks to some yummy easy to assemble recipes). You will need:

  • Romaine or Butter Lettuce
  • Cold, cooked quinoa
  • Cold, sprouted lentils
  • For the dressing:
  • Homemade mayo (you can of course use regular but it is very thick so perhaps dilute with some red wine vinegar to make it more of a dressing consistency).
  • Homemade salsa (the specific taste of the Lacto-Fermented Salsa found in Nourishing Traditions is what I love but any salsa fresca will do.
Build and enjoy! This is so filling (with the Quinoa and the Lentils) but I have made without the Quinoa and it is still super great. The combination of these flavors is my current go to favorite for my lunches and side dinner salads!

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Condiments are a great starting point for getting healthier in the kitchen. One of the first ingredients in most condiments is high fructose corn syrup. While this may not be the case for mayo, mayo is not a condiment usually associated with a healthy diet…until now! Homemade mayonnaise imparts valuable enzymes to sandwiches, salads and more! I have been using this mayonnaise as part of my salad dressing and it is so good! If you choose to add whey it will add additional enzymes as well as stabilize it. Mayo made without the whey will last about 2 weeks in the fridge whereas made with whey will last several months (good luck keeping it in the fridge for that long).

If you were not a mayo lover, I would still recommend trying this out. It has a different taste, texture and consistency than store bought mayo (since it doesn’t have artificial thickeners and food coloring!).

One of the main things to learn when shopping is how to interpret the ingredient list. Rule of thumb is if you can’t pronounce it, it probably doesn’t need to be there. Part of eliminating processed food from our diet means just that…keep the ingredients SIMPLE and easy to pronounce! Here is what I found on my mayo container (and keep in mind, this is the Olive Oil version of Best Foods so it is already a “better” start since it doesn’t have as many of the bad oils:

“Water, Oils (Soybean Oil, Extra Virgin Olive Oil), Vinegar, whole eggs and egg yolks, modified corn starch, sugar, salt, lemon juice, sorbic acid, calcium disodium edta (used to protect quality), xanthan gum, citric acid, natural flavors, oleoresin paprika, beta carotene (color).”

I have highlighted the ingredients that are necessary (even if not for my recipe listed below, they are acceptable for a mayo recipe). The rest are “fillers”. Pretty sad if you ask me. There are 11 extra ingredients! Paprika is found as an optional ingredient in mine, but Paprika in the form “oleoresin paprika” is a paprika concentrate and is primarily used for coloring. Again, why these unnecessary additives?

Your body doesn’t need these additives and in fact it confuses your body. Items not needed can turn into fat, or build up on the intestinal tract causing a lifetime of damage. Stick with simple, whole ingredients and when possible, make them at home!

Nikki’s Simple Mayonnaise

1 whole egg, at room temperature

1 egg yolk, at room temperature

1/2 teaspoon dry mustard

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 tablespoon whey, optional (but it will keep longer and add more benefits if used)

1/4 rounded teaspoon paprika, optional (does change color slightly)

3/4 to 1 cup sunflower oil, expeller pressed coconut oil (not virgin), sesame oil, olive oil (or combination thereof)

1/4 teaspoon salt (more or less to taste)

Add all ingredients, except for Sunflower oil and salt, to food processor. Blend well (about 30 seconds). Add a slow steady stream of oil. Add salt and taste. If you used whey, leave out 7-10 hours to let “set”. The mayo will thicken and develop more flavor over time.

Enjoy!

Nikki

This post is shared on Monday Mania and Traditional Tuesday’s and Real Food Wednesday’s, Pennywise Platters and Simple Lives and Fight Back Friday

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3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1 garlic clove, minced (1/2 teaspoon prepared minced garlic)

1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley

1 teaspoon chopped fresh basil

1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary

2+ Tablespoons EVOO

1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper

Combine all ingredients together and whisk.

Serving Suggestion: Grill squash, zucchini, red onions and red peppers (toss in EVOO and sprinkle with S&P just before grilling). Right off the grill drizzle with the Balsamic Dressing and serve. Such a hit! For use on a salad add more EVOO to get desired consistency and to increase amount of dressing.

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